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Element

noun: one of four substances thought in ancient and medieval cosmology to constitute the physical universe: Earth, Water, Air and Fire. See ether, subdivision
noun: any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
noun: an artifact that is one of the individual parts of which a composite entity is made up; especially a part that can be separated from or attached to a system

Keely
[In Keely's jargon] "Elements are defined as simple substances out of which no other two or more essentially differing substances have been obtained. Compounds are bodies out of which two or more essentially differing substances have been obtained. A molecule is the smallest part of a compound or element that is capable of existence in a free state. Atoms are set down, by those who believe in the atomic theory, as the indivisible constituents of molecules. Thus, an element is a substance made up of atoms of the same kind, a compound is a substance made up of atoms of unlike kind." [HYDROGEN - Snell]


Ramsay
The simple natural scale is the fifth; the compound natural scale is the octave; the harmony scale, or chord-scale, is the three fifths; the great genetic scale is six octaves; for, like the six creation days, it takes the six octaves to give birth to the elements of which the wondrous structure of our music is built up; the birthplace of B, the seventh of the octave scale, is the sixth octave of the great genetic scale. The area of the twelve major and twelve minor scales is twelve fifths or seven octaves, the twelfth fifth being a comma and the apotome minor in advance of the seventh octave. This is a quantity so small that it can be ignored in real music; and the two notes, say E# and F, joined to close the circle of this horizon of our music world. E# is the top of the twelfth fifth, and F is the top of the seventh octave; and they are practically, though not exactly mathematically, the same note. Illustrations of this will be found among the plates of this work. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 79]

A very important thing in the making of a violin, after a good form, a right balancing of part against part, and all of wood in skillful condition, is the violin varnish. Composition:-

Linseed oil boiled,... ... ... 1 part.
Isinglass, ... ... ... ... 1/2 part.
Turpentine, ... ... ... ... Quantum suf.

Give two coats with this, then rub down with fine sandpaper. Then, best copal varnish, one coat. Finish then with boiled linseed oil, thickened with sifted 'rotten stone.' This gives a fine, smooth, and dull surface. Ramsay's violins are of surpassing tone; and he considered the varnish an important element in violin-making. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 85]

In respect of harmony, the natural scale of five notes is like the scale of man's five senses; as the other notes can be compounded so as to form the octave of harmony, so sensation is joined by reflection, and new elements of knowledge come into existence in the process of reasoning. But the knowledge we have in our logical deductions is knowledge on different terms from sensation, which is intuitive; though if the logical process be rightly done, it is knowledge as certainly as the compound chords of the octave scale are harmony, quite as much, and a little more, perhaps, though on more complex terms, as that of the five notes of the natural scale. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 86]

The sympathy of one thing with another, and of one part of a thing with another part of it, arises from the principle of unity. For example, a string requires to be uniform and homogenous to have harmonics producing a fine quality of tone by the sweet blendings of sympathy; if it be not so, the tone may be miserable ... You say you wish I were in touch with Mr. Keely; so do I myself ... I look upon numbers very much as being the language which tells out the doings of Nature. Mr. Keely begins with sounds, whose vibrations can be known and registered. I presume that the laws of ratio, position, duality, and continuity, all the laws which go to mould the plastic air by elastic bodies into the sweetness of music, as we find them operative in the low silence of oscillating pendulums, will also be found ruling and determining all in the high silence of interior vibrations which hold together or shake asunder the combinations which we call atoms and ultimate elements, but which may really be buildings of wondrous complexity occupying different ranges of place and purpose between the visible cosmos and Him who built and evermore buildeth all things. The same laws, though operating in different spheres, make the likenesses of things in motion greater than the differences. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 87]

"The organic structure of music is formed by the three ratios of 1:2, 1:3, and 1:5, from the laws of quantities and motions; but as it is only the ratio of 1:2 that has a pure, unmixed, invariable character, and as the notes produced by the first, second, and third powers of THREE have different degrees of centrifugal force, and the character of the notes produced by the first power of FIVE depends on the character of the notes from which they are derived, so the final character of the notes and chords is determined by the amount of force which they have acquired from the way in which they have been derived, and from their position in the system; and no matter how these notes may be afterwards placed, like chemical elements, they never lose their original force. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 95]

The intervening chord between the Diatonic and Chromatic systems, B, D, F. - This chord, which has suffered expatriation from the society of perfect chords, is nevertheless as perfect in its own place and way as any. From its peculiar relation to both major and minor, and to both diatonic and chromatic things, it is a specially interesting triad. F, which is the genetic root of all, and distinctively the root of major subdominant, has here come to the top by the prime 2. D, here in the middle, is diatonically the top of the major dominant, and the root of the minor subdominant; and on account of its self-duality, the most interesting note of all; begotten in the great genesis by the prime 3. B, the last-begotten in the diatonic genesis, top of the diatonic minor, middle of the dominant major, and begotten by the prime 5, is here the quasi root of this triad, which in view of all this is a remarkable summation of things. This B, D, F is the mors janua vitae in music, for it is in a manner the death of diatonic chords, being neither a perfect major nor a perfect minor chord; yet it is the birth and life of the chromatic phase of music. In attracting and assimilating to itself the elements by which it becomes a full chromatic chord, it gives the minor dominant the G# which we so often see in use, and never see explained; and it gives the major subdominant a corresponding A♭, less frequently used. It is quite clear that this chromatic chord in either its major phase as B, D, F, A♭, or its minor phase as G#, B, D, F, is as natural and legitimate in music as anything else; and like the diatonic chords, major and minor, it is one of three, exactly like itself, into which the octave of semitones is perfectly divided. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 101]

together on radial lines from the center they appear grouped in various chords and combinations, dropping out and coming in in such succession as to constitute what Ramsay, whose genius was given to set this thus before us, calls "Nature's Grand Fugue." Beginning at F in the center at the top, and moving either to the right or to the left, after a run of 7 notes we have 4 consecutive Octaves, and then comes the Minor fifth, A-E, followed by the Major fifth, G-D; and this by another Major fifth, F-C; the combinations keep changing till at the quarter of the circle we come to F, A, C, E, G, a combination of the subdominant and tonic Major; and after another varied series of combinations we have at the half of the circle the elements of 2 minor chords, D, F, A and A, C, E, and one Major chord, C, E, G; at the third quarter we have a repetition of the first quarter group; and the various chords and combinations dropping out and coming in, fugue-like; finally we return to where we began, and end with the three-times-three chord, in which the whole 25 notes are struck together, and make that wondrous and restful close of this strange Fugue. No one can hear the thrice-threefold chord of this close and ever forget it; it is "the lost chord" found; and leads the saintly heart away to the Three in One who is the Lord of Hosts; Maker of Heaven and Earth, and all the host of them. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 103]


Russell
If the Coulomb law were valid, it would not be possible to gather together one ounce of any one element. [A New Concept of the Universe, page 18]

See Also


A New Creed the book
birth
carbon
Compound
Elements of Progress Aristocracy Freedom Conservatism and Abolitionism
ether
Etheric Elements
Figure 7B.08 - Russells Periodic Chart of the Elements
hydrogen
Law of Atomolic Synthesis of Chemical Elements
seed
sodium
Subdivision
Table 13.03 - Photoelectric Effect of Elements
Table of the Elements
The Russell Nine Octave Chart of the Elements
universal element
8.9 - Elements of the SVP Model

Created by Dale Pond. Last Modification: Sunday December 20, 2020 03:43:19 MST by Dale Pond.