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Compound

NOUN: something that consists of two or more substances mixed together; multiple elements, things or conditions considered as a mixed or alloyed unit.
VERB: to mix two or more substances together in order to make a new substance or product.


Keely
In all molecular dissociation or disintegration of both simple and compound elements, whether gaseous or solid, a stream of vibratory antagonistic thirds, sixths, or ninths, on their chord mass will compel progressive subdivisions. In the disintegration of water the instrument is set on thirds, sixths, and ninths, to get the best effects. These triple conditions are focalized on the neutral center of said instrument so as to induce perfect harmony or concordance to the chord note of the mass chord of the instruments full combination, after which the diatonic and the enharmonic scale located at the top of the instrument, or ring, is thoroughly harmonized with the scale of ninths which is placed at the base of the vibratory transmitter with the telephone head. The next step is to disturb the harmony on the concentrative thirds, between the transmitter and the disintegrator. This is done by rotating the siren so as to induce a sympathetic communication along the nodal transmitter, or wire, that associates the two instruments. When the note of the siren becomes concordant to the neutral center of the disintegrator, the highest order of sympathetic communication is established. It is now necessary to operate the transferable vibratory negatizer or negative accelerator, which is seated in the center of the diatonic and enharmonic ring, at the top of the disintegrator, and complete disintegration will follow (from the antagonisms induced on the concordants by said adjunct) in triple progression, thus: First thirds: Molecular dissociation resolving the water into a gaseous compound of hydrogen and oxygen. Second: sixths, resolving the hydrogen and oxygen into a new element by second order of dissociation, producing what I call low atomic ether. Third: ninths, the low atomic ether resolved into a new element, which I denominate high or second atomic harmonic. All these transmissions being simultaneous on the disturbance of sympathetic equilibrium by said negative accelerator. [Snell Manuscript - The Book, page 4]

[In Keely's jargon] "Elements are defined as simple substances out of which no other two or more essentially differing substances have been obtained. Compounds are bodies out of which two or more essentially differing substances have been obtained. A molecule is the smallest part of a compound or element that is capable of existence in a free state. Atoms are set down, by those who believe in the atomic theory, as the indivisible constituents of molecules. Thus, an element is a substance made up of atoms of the same kind, a compound is a substance made up of atoms of unlike kind." [HYDROGEN - Snell]

Dimensional or Inter-Dimensional Beings
"There is much atmospheric celestial material that has never been revealed to man's senses. Attenuated elements extend to infinite reaches beyond hydrogen, including actual substances or compounds which have never been revealed to our senses. Beings fashioned of these substances could walk by our sides unseen and cast no shadow in the noonday sun." [Keely, The Operation of the Vibratory Circuit, The Connecting Link Between Mind and Matter - Keelys Progress - Part 2]

All quiescent matter consists of compound molecules of different groupings. These groupings are in simple ratios. Each group is surrounded by an envelope in which occur axes of force, according to the form of grouping and this form varies with each substance. The variations in form of the crystals are caused by varying attractions between the different internal molecular elements. [Snell Manuscript - the book, MOLECULAR AGGREGATES]


Schauberger
[8] Fatty matter. In its association with what Viktor Schauberger calls 'sweet matter', a creative, formative substance, this relates to compounds principally containing carbon C and hydrogen H (carbohydrates - CH) and all the elements under the collective term 'carbone' or 'mother-substances'. In this regard, despite its general 'neutrality' as a carrier substance (like a woman with child), H is more inclined to the feminine than the masculine. — Ed. [The Energy Evolution - Harnessing Free Energy from Nature, The Life-Current in Air and Water]


Metabolism
Metabolic reactions may be categorized as catabolic – the breaking down of compounds (for example, of glucose to pyruvate by cellular respiration); or anabolic – the building up (synthesis) of compounds (such as proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids). Usually, catabolism releases energy, and anabolism consumes energy. [Metabolism]


Ramsay
where there stands an open door between the sixth and the seventh, these two having no note in common, it is easy and natural to slip out of the key into another, either in ascending the major or descending the minor octave; and in order to keep in the key, the two chords of these notes have to reach out to each other a helping hand, and compound in order to affiliate. This, however, by the law of sympathy and assimilation, which reigns in this happy, realm, they are always ready to do.1 [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 66]

The number of Diatonic Chords. In the major there are three simple chords, two compound chords, and two double compound, seven in all - subdominant, tonic, dominant, subdominant sixth, subdominant fourth, dominant seventh, and dominant ninth. In the minor there are the same number and order, making fourteen. It is not normal to the tonic chord to compound, but it may, in exceptional instances; the major tonic may, in a certain cadence, assume the top of the minor subdominant; and the minor tonic may assume, in a cognate case, the root of the major dominant.1 [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 70]

All compound and double compound chords are made up of notes already developed for the simple chords; there is no genetic developing of compound chords. Simple chords are all begotten in the genesis; they are true species; compound chords are only varieties of them. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 70]

Why do we compound? Because it produces variety, and variety is one of the aspects of the beautiful; Nature loves and abounds in variety, without violation of her unity. And further, all creation throbs with sympathy, one thing feeling and tending toward another, nothing content in isolation; and compound chords are chords reaching out after assimilation to an affiliation with other adjacent chords, that they may be able, through something in [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 70]

common, to mingle with more chord-society. So those added thirds which constitute compound chords are like accomplishments acquired for this end, and they make such chords exceedingly interesting. The dominant assumes the root of the subdominant, and so becomes the dominant seventh that it may be affiliated with the subdominant chords. Inversely, the subdominant assumes the top of the dominant chord that it may be affiliated with the dominant. The major tonic may exceptionally be compounded with the top of the minor subdominant when it comes between that chord and its own dominant; and the minor tonic may in the same way assume the root of the major dominant when it comes between that chord and its subdominant. The minor subdominant D F A, and the major dominant G B D, are too great strangers to affiliate without some chord to introduce them; they seem to have one note in common, indeed, but we know that even these two D's are a comma apart, although one piano-key plays them both, and the F G and the A B are as foreign to each other as two seconds can be, each pair being 9 commas apart, and G A are 8 commas apart. In this case, as a matter of musical courtesy, the tonic chord comes in between; and when it is the minor subdominant that is to be introduced, the major tonic assumes the top of that chord, and then turns to its own major dominant and suavely gives the two to enter into fellowship; for the tonic received the minor subdominant through its semitonic E F, and carries it to the major dominant through its semitonic B C, along with C in common on the one side and G in common on the other. When it is the major dominant that is to be introduced to the minor subdominant the minor tonic fulfills the function, only the details are all reversed; it assumes the root of dominant, and by this note in common, and its A in common with its own subdominant, along with the semitonic second B C on the one hand and the semitonic E F on the other, all is made smooth and continuous. The whole of this mediatorial intervention on the part of the tonic is under the wondrous law of assimilation, which is the law of laws all through creation; but when the tonic chord has fulfilled this graceful action, it immediately drops the assumed note, and closes the cadence in its own simple form.1 [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 71]

How far does this compounding process go? The dominant seventh has the first note of the subdominant; the dominant ninth has the second; if we should add a third note, where are we? G B D F A C; here would be the dominant with the whole of the subdominant welded to it; it would have to be called the dominant eleventh, and it has brought us right through to the root of the tonic C. What would be the use of such a chord? We might, in a similar way, add the dominant to the subdominant till we should be through to the tonic on the other side; it would be G B D F A C, and so we should have reached the top of the tonic G. This process shows us, however, that there is just a certain length that we can go, and there is satisfaction in seeing exhaustively that so it is. When the beautiful becomes the useless, it ceases to be the beautiful. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 72]

less variety of effect than we find in the diatonic chords; for although these chords may appear with their notes diversely named, there are still only the three. On account of their cosmopolitan character they need, and they have, no compounding with anything else. They are themselves at home everywhere; like a universal joint, they can turn any way, and affiliate in all directions. Being 4-note chords, and all of minor thirds, their effect is always minor, and they fall with loving softness to the diatonic chords to which they resolve. How this chord in its germ is found in the diatonic chord-scale; how it becomes a 4-note chord of minor thirds; how it variously resolves, each one of the three, in three manners with 24 tonic chords - all this is so fully set forth in the pre-note and treatise on the chromatic chord that it need not be more discussed in this place. See also Plates XVI., XVII., XVIII., XIX., and XX. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 73]

In compound chords there are no new notes created; they are found by combining the notes of the simple chords. The dominant sevenths, major and minor, are compounded by adding one from the subdominant. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 79]

circumstances. And if we may add D to the subdominant chord of d F A C, so we may also, in other circumstances, add the subdominant chord as harmony to D, thus - D f a c, and no discord occur. There is only the interval of a second between F and G in this dominant 9th, and only an interval of a second between C and D in this subdominant 6th; a second standing alone is a discordant interval, as a poison by itself may kill; but as a poison by the processes of nature in chemistry compounded with something else may be an excellent medicine, so may a second when mixed and compounded with something else in music become an excellent harmony. Music is a great apothecary, skillful in compounds. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 81]

In respect of harmony, the natural scale of five notes is like the scale of man's five senses; as the other notes can be compounded so as to form the octave of harmony, so sensation is joined by reflection, and new elements of knowledge come into existence in the process of reasoning. But the knowledge we have in our logical deductions is knowledge on different terms from sensation, which is intuitive; though if the logical process be rightly done, it is knowledge as certainly as the compound chords of the octave scale are harmony, quite as much, and a little more, perhaps, though on more complex terms, as that of the five notes of the natural scale. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 86]

This tune is in the key of E♭ Major, and the key into which it moves for a passage is the next above it, B♭ Major. The first chord, E♭ G B♭, is the tonic; the second and third are the tonic and dominant; the fourth, C E♭ G, whose full form would be C E♭ G B♭, is the compound subdominant of the new key, which suggests the approaching modulation. The next two chords, in which the measure closes, may either be viewed as the tonic and dominant of the key, or the subdominant and tonic of the new key. The second measure opens with the same chord which closes the first measure, and is best defined as the tonic of the new key; the second chord is clearly the dominant of the new key, and the whole of the second measure is in the new key, and reads, T. D. S. T. compound D. T. Some of these chords might be read as chords of the old key, so near to each other and so kindred are the contiguous keys. All contiguous keys to a certain extent overlap each other, so that some of the chords may be variously read as belonging to the one or to the other. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 94]

dominant; and either of these chords may also follow the tonic; but when the dominant follows the subdominant, as they have no note in common, the root of the subdominant is added to the dominant chord, and this forms the dominant seventh; and when the subdominant follows the dominant, the top of the dominant is added to the subdominant, and this forms the subdominant sixth. The sixth and seventh of the octave scale is the only place these two compound chords are positively required; but from their modifying and resolvable character they are very generally used. When the dominant is compounded by having the root of the subdominant, its specific effect is considerably lower; and when the subdominant is compounded by having the top of the dominant, its specific effect is considerably higher. In the octave scale the notes of the subdominant and dominant chords are placed round the notes of the tonic chord in such a way was to give the greatest amount of contrast between their notes and the tonic notes. In the tonic chord the note which has the greatest amount of specific gravity is its root; and in the octave scale it has below it the middle and above it the top of the dominant, the two notes which have the greatest amount of specific levity; and in the octave scale it has above it the middle and below it the root of the subdominant - the two notes which the greatest amount of specific gravity. The third note of the scale, the middle of the tonic chord, is the center of the system, and is the note which has the least tendency either upwards or downwards, and it has above it the root of the subdominant, the note which has the greatest amount of specific gravity, and it has below it the top of the dominant, the note which has the greatest amount of specific levity. Thus the root of the subdominant is placed above, and the top of the dominant below, the center of the system; the specific gravity of the one above and the specific levity of the one below cause them to move in the direction of the center. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 98]

Fig. 3 illustrates the way Nature teaches us by example how to compound so as to enable chords that are separated by the intervention of others to pass to each other. In the middle of the chord scale Nature gives the root of the one chord to the top of the other, and the top of the one to the root of the other; in compounding we are taught by this example to do the same, and the top of the separated dominant is given to the root of the [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 120]

See Also


13.12 - Compound Equilibrium
14 - Chart with Symbols Defining the relative Simple and Compound Sympathetic Association
6.7.5 - Compound Cubes
Compound
compound chord
compound concordant impulses
compound device
Compound Disintegrator
compound dominant
compound etheric
compound etheric flow
Compound Interetheric
compound interetheric force
COMPOUND INTERETHERIC NEUTRAL CENTER SEVENTH SUBDIVISION
Compound Interetheron
Compound Interval
compound mechanical device
compound molecule
Compound Spin
compound subdominant
Compound Time
compound tonic
Compound Vibrations
Compound Vibratory Engine
compound vibratory negative medium
double compound pendulum
Figure 13.16 - Compound Equilibrium States
Figure 2.2 - Nested subdivisions of Matter from Molecular to Compound Interetheric
Figure 4.5 - Compound Gyroscopic or Vortex Motions
Figure 5.13 - Babbitt Atom constructed of Compound Vortexial Motions
Figure 7.12 - Keelys Compound Disintegrator
mixture
Ramsay - No Compounding of Chromatic Chords
Ramsay - PLATE XI - Diatonic Resolutions Simple and Compound
Ramsay - The interesting nature of Compound Chords
Ramsay - The Limit to Compounding of Chordscompound scale
Ramsay - The Octave Scale a Compound one the Fifth the Natural Scale

Created by Dale Pond. Last Modification: Saturday November 26, 2022 04:12:47 MST by Dale Pond.