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Color

Prism Rainbow colors

Likewise a fundamental music tone refracts or differentiates into the notes of its scale.

Music
Colour. A term variously employed in mideval treatises on music to represent: a repetition of a sound in part music; purity of tone; a movement of the voice from the part; an alteration of rhythm by different voices; a discord purposely introduced for the sake of variety. [Stainer, John; Barrett, W.A.; A Dictionary of Musical Terms; Novello, Ewer and Co., London, pre-1900]

Biology
"That the different colors of the spectrum have an influence on vegetation has long been known. Plants grown under green glass soon die; under red glass they live a long time, but become pale and slender. Mr. Yung, of the University of Geneva, has placed the eggs of frogs and fishes in similar conditions, and found that violet light quickens their development; and blue, yellow, and light also, but in a lesser degree. Tadpoles, on the contrary, die sooner in colored light than in white light. As regards frogs, Mr. Yung has ascertained that their development is not stopped by darkness, as some observers have supposed, but that the process is much slower than in the light."[Eclectic Magazine, 1880, pp 510]

Cayce
"Colors, to be sure, will often affect the body." Cayce (299-1)

"Colors affect the body, even as pollen does many another." Cayce (5511-1)

"Colors will also find an influence ... especially those not too severe, but the violet, ultra-violet, shades of green, of mode (mauve?) and pink. Though the others may make for a rigor oft in the entity, the delicate shades - or those which may be termed the spiritual - will influence the entity. When illness were to come about, soft music and the lighter shades or tones will quiet, where medicine would fail ... (may have stage or politics for vocation). In these fields the entity will gain the most; but the developing will come for the soul, for the spiritual portion, through music ... awakenings through color and song, and especially dirge..." Cayce (773-1)

"By color certain activities are also symbolized, - for instance, black indicates the whole combination of all. For, to material interpretation, white is the absence of color, black is the combination of them all. The dark blue indicates awakening; purple, healing; white, purity; gold, attaining. All of these and their varied shades indicate the activity; this applying to the stars as well as the sun or moon. The sun indicates strength and life, while the moon indicates change - and in one direction indicating the singleness of that activity through an individual experience, - the variations being indicated by the variations in color. Star, - the white, purity; the five-pointed, the whole senses of man indicated as attained to activity - the colors showing the variation; the forms of six, seven or eight pointed indicating the attainments, - as do the seven stars in a figure indicate the attaining to the seven particular centers in the body." Cayce (5746-1)

"We will find that colors influence the entity a great deal more, even, than musical forces in their tone, or the color in music. Drab colors and certain greens have an effect upon the entity that is almost such as to bring illness in the physical body; while purples or violets or shades of tan bring an exultant influence - tending to bring building influences to the entity." Cayce (482-124?)

"In those things that pertain to correlation of the spiritual or soul forces of the entity with its activities in colors, and inharmonious relationships: the tonal numbers are in F and C, while the colors should be purple - which denote the royalty of the associations and make for an influence in the vibrations about the entity. And this, with violet, should be about the body when there is any disorder in the vibrations in the body; for the effect these have upon the relationships between the physical, mental and soul-developing forces ...would give strength to the activities in relationship with the body." Cayce (324-1)

"Each body, each activity, each soul-entity vibrates better to this, that or other color... Colors are naturally the spiritualization of tone or sound..." Cayce (288-38)

(SVP) There is a correspondence between color and music notes. For SVP purposes the correspondences below are used. (Subject to change at any time for any reason.)

Color Note Indig
Infrared
Dark Red
RedC
OrangeD 1
YellowE 2
White
GreenF 3
BlueG 4
IndigoA
VioletB
UltravioletBb

See Table 12.02.01 - Wavelengths and Frequencies
Table 11.03 - Roots Powers of Two and Indig Numbers

Circle of Modes

Colors of Music Notes

Sound Colors 1

Sound Colors 2

Russell
"The master-tone of each octave is the inheritance of the original motion of the thinking process of Mind. These master-tones are the "inert gases" which are classified in the zero group of the Mendeleef table.

The state of motion of these inert gases is that of motion-in-inertia."

"Motion-in-inertia is that state of pressure equilibrium which lies between any two masses.

"The inertial line, or plane is that dividing line, or plane, toward which all masses discharge their potential.

"It is the line, or plane, of lowest potential of two opposing areas of potential, where opposing pressures neutralize. This is the plane of minimum pressure of two opposing areas.

"The master-tones which represent a state of motion-in-inertia and are the inert gases, bear the same relationship to the elements that white bears to the colors. They are a registration of them all. White is not included in the spectrum, it has no place there. The inert gases should not be included in the elements. They have no place there. Of this more shall be written later in its proper place." [Russell, The Universal One]


Hughes
On colours developing by the same laws as musical harmonies
—The physical properties of light and darkness briefly considered
—If the laws are correctly gained, harmonics of tones and of colours will agree
—Quotation from a lecture by Professor W. F. Barrett on the order of sonorous and luminous wave-lengths
—Fountain of musical harmonics, E root of B; in colours yellow and ultra-violet, being tints and shades of white and black
—All harmonics of sound and colour condense into a primo springing from the fountain
Multequivalency of tones and colours
Wünsch's views nearly one hundred years ago
Clerk Maxwell's, Lord Rayleigh's, and [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Table of Contents1 - Harmonies]

Helmholtz's experiments on developing colours shown to agree with the scheme
—The sounds of the Falls of Niagara are in triplets or trinities
—The Arabian system divides tones into thirds
—Two trinities springing from unity apparently the germ of never-ending developments in tones and colours
—Inequality of the equinoctial points; is the want of equilibrium the motive power of the entire universe?
—The double tones of keyed instruments, the meetings by fifths, the major and minor keys, so agree with the development of colours, that a correct eye would detect errors in a piece of coloured music
Numbers not entered upon, but develope by the same laws
Bass notes omitted in order to simplify the scheme, 18 [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Table of Contents2 - Harmonies]

The chords
The fourteen roots of the chords of the twelve major keys
—A threefold major chord examined, fourfold with its octave
—The seven of each key seen to have two chords and its scale one chord, thirty-six in all, forty-eight with octaves
—The chords of the twelve keys as they follow in order are written in musical clef
Colours seen to agree, . . . 27 [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Table of Contents2 - Harmonies]

The following scheme endeavours to show that the development of the musical gamut and the colours of the rainbow are regulated by the same laws. I wish it to be clearly understood that I have gained the evolutions from the mysterious type of Life—a golden thread running throughout the Scriptures, from the first chapter of Genesis to the last of Revelation;—life developing around us and within us from the Almighty, who is its Eternal Fountain. My youthful impressions included the belief that the views of Dr. Darwin, my great-uncle, contradicted the teaching of the Scriptures, and I therefore avoided them altogether. Having endeavoured for years to gain correctly the laws which develope Evolution, I suddenly discovered that I was working from Scripture on the same foundation which he had found in Creation; and as Creation and Revelation proceed from the same Author, I knew that they could not contradict each other. It is considered by many that my cousin, Charles Darwin, gained his first ideas of Evolution from his grandfather's works; but I know from himself that he was ignorant of them, and that his theory of Evolution was arrived at by his close experiments and observations of the laws of creation alone. Only a few months since, after reading his work on "the Movements of Plants," published in 1881, and wishing to be certain that I had not an incorrect belief, I asked the following question—"Did you gain your views on Evolution by your wonderfully acute observations, ignorant of your grandfather's ideas?" The reply was, that he had done so entirely from his own observations. [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Introduction1 - Harmonies, page 9]

I had for a long time studied the development of the harmonics of colour, and believed that I had gained them correctly; but I saw no way of proving this. The thought occurred—Why not test the laws in musical harmonies? I wrote down the development of the seven major keys of the white notes in keyed instruments. I was perplexed by the movement as of "to and fro," but the development of numbers explained this point, and I found that the method of development in colours, tones, and numbers agreed. I remembered the keys with sharps, but had forgotten that B♭ belonged to the key of F, and here I thought that the laws failed. But I found by reference that all were correct, the eighth being the first of a higher series, the laws having enabled me to distinguish between flats and sharps, [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, General Remarks on Harmonies of Tones and Colours, page 12]


ON COLOURS AS DEVELOPED BY THE SAME LAWS AS MUSICAL HARMONIES.


"And God said, Let there be light, and there was light."—GEN. i.3.
"God is light, and in Him is no darkness at all."—I JOHN i.5.
[Harmonies of Tones and Colours, On Colours as Developed by the same Laws as Musical Harmonies1, page 18]

WE know not for how many ages colours have been developing. "In the beginning, darkness was upon the face of the deep." The physical properties of light are probably the deepest and most interesting studies in physical science. I only touch upon light as the acting energy or life, causing, in its struggles with darkness, not only the varieties of colour around us, but the colour even of light itself, as colours arise from rays of light exercising different influences. [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, On Colours as Developed by the same Laws as Musical Harmonies1, page 18]

The primitive laws of any science should be capable of succinct statement, but in combination with others they become more complex and delicate, and error is proved if in the developments they do not echo each other. If, therefore, musical harmonies are correctly gained, the same laws will develope harmonies of colour, and will agree with the colour of the rainbow, the circle of which is divided by the horizon. All who are interested in the laws which regulate these two sciences will doubtless know the interesting lectures delivered by W. F. Barrett (Professor of Experimental Physics in the Royal College of Science, Dublin), and the article written by him and published in the Quarterly Journal of Science, January, 1870, entitled "Light and Sound; an examination of their reputed analogy, showing the oneness of colour and music as a physical basis." I will quote shortly from the latter for the benefit of those who may not have met with it. "The question arises, Has all this æsthetic oneness of colour and music any physical foundation, over and above the general analogy we have so far traced between light and sound? We believe the following considerations will show, not only that it has some foundation, but that the analogy is far more wonderful than has hitherto been [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, On Colours as Developed by the same Laws as Musical Harmonies1, page 18]

suspected. Let us take as our standard of colours the series given by the disintegration of white light, the so-called spectrum: as our standard of musical notes, let us take the natural or diatonic scale. We may justly compare the two, for the former embraces all possible gradations of simple colours, and the latter a similar gradation of notes of varying pitch. Further, the succession of colours in the spectrum is perfectly harmonious to the eye. Their invariable order is— red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet; any other arrangement of the colours is less enjoyable. Likewise, the succession of notes in the scale is the most agreeable that can be found. The order is—C, D, E, F, G, A, B; any attempt to ascend or descend the entire scale by another order is disagreeable. The order of colours given in the spectrum is exactly the order of luminous wave-lengths, decreasing from red to violet. The order of notes in the scale is also exactly the order of sonorous wave-lengths, decreasing from C to B." [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, On Colours as Developed by the same Laws as Musical Harmonies2, page 19]

"Now comes the important question—Are the intermediate colours of the spectrum produced by vibrations that bear a definite ratio to the vibrations giving rise to the intermediate notes of the scale? According to our knowledge up to this time, apparently not." [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, On Colours as Developed by the same Laws as Musical Harmonies2, page 19]

"Comparing wave-lengths of light with wave-lengths of sound—not, of course, their actual lengths, but the ratio of one to the other—the following remarkable correspondence at once comes out:—Assuming the note C to correspond to the colour red, then we find that D exactly corresponds to orange, E to yellow, and F to green. Blue and indigo, being difficult to localise, or even distinguish in the spectrum, they are put together; their mean exactly corresponds to the note G: violet would then correspond to the ratio given by the note A. The colours having now ceased, the ideal position of B and the upper C are calculated from the musical ratio." [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, On Colours as Developed by the same Laws as Musical Harmonies2, page 19]

This quotation on vibrations will be seen to agree with the laws which I have gained. The fact that six of the notes of keyed instruments are obliged to act two parts, must prevent the intermediate notes bearing a definite ratio of vibrations with the intermediate colours of the spectrum. I name the note A as violet, and B ultra-violet, as it seemed to me clearer not to mention the seventh as a colour. [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, On Colours as Developed by the same Laws as Musical Harmonies2, page 19]

The fountain or life of musical harmonies and colours is E, or yellow; the root B, or ultra-violet: these being, in fact, tints and shades of white and black. Ascending, they partake more of white; descending, of black: the former drawing tones and colours higher, the latter lower. [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, On Colours as Developed by the same Laws as Musical Harmonies2, page 19]

densed into a pair; as an example, we trace the notes and colours in the fundamental scale of C. [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, On Colours as Developed by the same Laws as Musical Harmonies3, page 20]


C rises from the fountain, and contains all tones within itself. Red also rises from the fountain, and contains all colours, with white and black.
D=the notes C and E mingled. Orange, red and yellow mingled.
E=the root of the fountain. Yellow, containing all colours, is white in its extreme.
F=the notes E and G mingled. Green=yellow and blue mingled.
G contains all tones. Blue, with more or less of black and white.
A=G and B mingled. Violet=blue, and all colours, inclining to black.
B, the key-note of the fountain. Ultra-violet=violet mingled with more black: a deeper shade of all colours—in its extreme, black. Orange, red and yellow mingled.
[Harmonies of Tones and Colours, On Colours as Developed by the same Laws as Musical Harmonies3, page 20]

Notes and colours are thus condensed into a pair springing from the fountain, and mingling with each other in an endless variety. Although yellow as a colour is explained away as white, it is, nevertheless, the colour yellow in endless tints and shades throughout nature, and proves to us that the three great apparent primaries correspond to the tonic chord of the scale of Ci.e., C, E, G = red, yellow, blue; or more correctly, C and G correspond to red and blue with the central fountain of E, white and black mingled, from which all tones and colours arise. [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, On Colours as Developed by the same Laws as Musical Harmonies3, page 20]

"Their music is of a style very difficult for foreigners to acquire or imitate, but the children very easily and early attain it. I low much the Arabs profited by the works of ancient Greek writers is well known."† As knowledge increases, may not the beginning of every physical science be traced first as a trinity springing from a trinity in unity, followed by a second partaking of the nature of the first, so as to unite with it in complementary pairs as here described in tones and colours, trinity in unity being the germ of never-ending developments? [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, The Arabian System of Music, page 21]

The inequality of the equinoctial points is a well-known fact. It will be seen how apparent this is in the developments of harmonies. From the moment that trinities depart from unity, the balance is unequal, and the repeated endeavours after closer union cause a perpetual restlessness. May not this want of equilibrium be the life or motive power of the entire universe, with its continuous struggle after concord, even to oneness? "Closer and closer union is the soul of perfect harmony." In tracing harmonies of tones and colours, the double tones of keyed instruments will be seen to correspond with the intermediate tints and shades of colours. The twelve notes, scales, and chords in the major and minor series, the meetings by fifths, &c., all agree so exactly in their mode of development, that if a piece of music is written correctly in colours with the intermediate tints and shades, the experienced musician can, as a rule, detect errors more quickly and surely with the eye than the ear, and the correct eye, even of a non-musical person, may detect technical errors. Although the arithmetical relation has been most useful in gaining the laws, it is not here entered upon; but numbers equally meet all the intricacies both of tones and colours. The bass notes have been omitted, in order to simplify the scheme. [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, The Arabian System of Music, page 21]

The twelve which develope twelve major harmonies are written thus

Half Note

the other six which are incapabable of developing major harmonies thus

Whole Note

without regard to musical time. The seven colours are shown to answer to the seven white notes, the other five being intermediate tones and colours. A flat marked to a note indicates that it is nearer to the tone or colour below; a sharp means that it is nearer to the tone or colour above. The notes and chasms are not written according to accurately measured degrees. [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Diagram I - The Eighteen Tones of Keyed Instruments, page 22a]

The keys of C and G meeting are coloured, and show the beautiful results of colours arising from gradual progression when meeting by fifths. Each key-note and its trinities have been traced as complete in itself, and all knit into each other, the seven of each rising a tone and developing seven times through seven octaves, the keys mingled. The twelve scales have been traced, developing seven times through seven octaves, all knit into each other and into the key-notes and their trinities. The chords have also been traced, each complete in itself, and all knit into each other and into the key-notes, trinities, and scales. And lastly, one series of the twelve keys, no longer mingled, but modulating into each other, have been traced, closely linked into each other by fifths through seven octaves, three keys always meeting. Mark the number of notes thus linked together, and endeavour to imagine this number of tones meeting from the various notes. [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, The Twelve Scales Meeting by Fifths, page 31a]

Ascending, begin with C in the innermost circle, F being its root. The Key-note C becomes the root of G, G becomes the root of D, and so on. In descending, begin with the octave Key-note C in the outermost circle. F, the root of C, becomes the fifth lower Key-note. F is the next Key-note, and becomes the root of B♭, &c. The 12 Keys in their order are written in musical clef below. Lastly, the Keys of C and G, ascending on a keyed instrument, are written in music as descending; therefore, to shew correctly notes and colours meeting, it is necessary to reverse them, and write C below G. All are seen to be complementary pairs in tones and colours. [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Diagram VII Continued2, page 31e]

In the musical clef the sixth and seventh notes from A, the fundamental minor key-note, are repeated, in order to show the use of the poles D#-C♭, and that the colours agree. The use of the two poles, both in the major and minor series, is strikingly evident. [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Diagram X - Minor Keynotes Developing by Sevens, page 35a]

ALTHOUGH only twelve notes of a keyed instrument develope perfect minor harmonics, there are fifteen different chords, the double tones D#-E♭, E#-F♭, A#-B♭ all sounding as roots. The fifteen roots are written in musical clef. A major and a minor fifth embrace the same number of key-notes, but the division into threefold chords is different. In counting the twelve, a major fifth has four below the third note of its harmony, and three above it; a minor fifth has three below the third note of its harmony, and four above it. A major seventh includes twelve key-notes, a minor seventh only eleven. As an example of the minor chords in the different keys, we may first examine those in the key of A, written in musical clef. The seven of its harmony have two threefold chords, and two of its ascending scale. If we include the octave note, the highest chord of the descending scale is a repetition (sounding an octave higher) of the lowest chord of the seven in its harmony, and the second chord of the descending scale is a repetition of the first chord of its ascending scale. These two repetition chords are only written to the key of A: the chords of the other eleven keys will all be found exactly to agree with those of A in their mode of development. We may again remark on the beautiful effect which would result if the colours of the minor chords could be seen, with the tones, as they develope. [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Diagram XII - The Chords of the Twelve Minor Keys, page 37a]

If we examine the line last quoted by the laws of life which regulate the foregoing scheme, we may compare it with the fundamental threefold chord of the scale of C and its relative colours,


C
E
G
C red rises

from the fountain key-note which contains in itself all tones. "Him first," the Son of God proceeding from the Almighty, and yet in Himself the Trinity in Unity. E, yellow or light. E is the root of B, ultra indigo, or black. "Him midst," the Almighty Father, the Fountain of life, light gradually rising and dispelling darkness. G, blue, "Him last," the Holy Spirit, proceeding from the Father and the Son, Trinity in Unity. The Son of God and the Holy Spirit are the complemental working pair throughout the universe; each containing "the seven spirits of life." Red and blue contain all colours in each. C and G are a complemental pair, C rising from the fountain key-note which contains in itself all tones, and C and G combine all tones in each. In Chapter III. it is explained that all varieties of tones and colours may be condensed into this pair, rising from and falling again into the fountain. [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Reflections on the Scheme2, page 44]

If the foregoing harmonies of sound and of colour have been rightly developed from the Scriptures, I trust they will be considered as steps gained towards the belief that Evolution is the law of the Almighty for the continuance of activity throughout the universe, and towards an increasing study of Creation and Revelation as mutually explaining each other. According to my belief, the Scriptures must be based on the principle which is explained of keyed instruments at the conclusion of Chapter II. In the development of musical harmonies the beginning and the ending are unfathomable. It is the same in the Scriptures. No musical note or colour can be separated from those below and above it. Neither can any portion of the Bible be separated: every part embraces the past, [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Reflections on the Scheme4, page 46]

1867.—"Your plan of eliciting facts from Scripture (altogether new) interests me exceedingly." "To make out the scheme of harmonical parallel proper for the elucidation of your system, it will, if possible, run all true with the harmony of colour, and this has never yet been done, except in a way which has been met with serious objections. When I commenced the examination of your theory, I spent five days at the British Museum, and collated about forty volumes." "I am very glad to hear you have a probability of harmonising numbers by the same laws as light and sound." "What you call rest, I call the appearance and disappearance of a harmonical cycle." "Your series of fifths is quite correct." [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Extracts from Dr. Gauntlett's Letters1, page 48]

1871.—"There has been much written lately respecting colour and tone, but nothing bearing on your own view." "The new theories in music seem inclined to go back to the ancient faith of Pythagoras, everything being used up with the modern notions of tonality. Perhaps we may find a great change at hand; the present system, limiting, as it does, that which is illimitable, cannot be right." [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Extracts from Dr. Gauntlett's Letters1, page 48]

1874.—"I have been intending to write to you with a full scheme, your scheme so differs from any put forth in these modern days. Like all theories—for there is no exception—my plan does not come up to clear demonstration. It is like the colour theory. No doubt simplicity [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Extracts from Dr. Gauntlett's Letters1, page 48]

IN preparing for a Supplement to "Tones and Colours," several musicians have carefully investigated the work. I transcribe a copy of Dr. Chalmers Masters' opinion, as he had previously studied colours:— [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Supplementary Remarks and Diagrams, page 53]

"I esteem myself fortunate in being introduced to you, and becoming acquainted with your beautiful work on 'Tones and Colours.' I have, to the best of my ability, worked out your idea, by writing down in music the various discords in use amongst musicians, and resolving them according to the laws of Harmony, and I find in all cases the perfect triad agrees with what you term the trinities in colours. The way in which you find the whole circle of Major and Minor keys by pairs in colours is deeply interesting, and must be true. The only point of divergence between your system and that recognised by all musicians is the ascending Minor Scale. No musically trained ear can tolerate the seventh note being a whole tone from the eighth. The Minor second in the lower octave descending is very beautiful, and it is strange how all composers feel a desire to use it. To mention one case out of hundreds, I may cite Rossini's well-known air, 'La Danza.'
"Yours faithfully,
"W. CHALMERS MASTERS." [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Supplementary Remarks and Diagrams, page 53]

See Also


Black
Blue
Chord
Figure 12.03 - Scale Showing Relations of Light Color and Tones
Figure 4.16 - Break-out of Colors Tones and Attributes
Figure 4.17 - Musical Relationships of Colors Tones and Attributes
Figure 7B.01 - Colors Represent Relative Frequencies
Figure 7B.02 - Colors and Tones
Frequency Wavelength Light Energy
Gray
Green
Harmonic Vibrations and Vibration Figures
Harmonies of Tones and Colours - Developed by Evolution
Indigo
intermediate tints
Interval
Light
Music
music note or sound colors
Note
orange
red
Spectra
Table 12.02.01 - Wavelengths and Frequencies
Table 11.03 - Roots Powers of Two and Indig Numbers
Tables
The Physics of Love 2.0 - The Ultimate Universal Laws
The Scientific Basis and Build of Music
The Secret of Light
The Universal One
tint
Tone
Violet
Ultraviolet
Visible Sound
white
Yellow
12.40 - Color

Created by Dale Pond. Last Modification: Friday April 9, 2021 04:54:01 MDT by Dale Pond.