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art

Aristotle
“The aim of Art, is not to represent the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance.” [Aristotle]


Cayce
"There are things some call higher arts. But what is meant by high? It means expressing beauty, love, sympathy, patience, longsuffering, brotherly love. In whatever state, in whatever position one may find themself, if they are expressed they will bring harmony, peace and understanding." [Cayce1367-1]


Russell
"Great art is simple. My universe is great art, for it is simple.

"Great art is balanced. My universe is consummate art, for it is balanced simplicity.

"My universe is one in which many things have majestic measure; and again another many have measure too fine for sensing.

"Yet I have not one law for majestic things, and another law for things which are beyond the sensing.

"I have but one law for all My opposed pairs of creating things; and that law needs but one word to spell it out, so hear Me when I sat that the one word of My one law is

BALANCE

And if man needs two words to aid him in his knowing of the workings of that law, those two words are

BALANCED INTERCHANGE

If man still needs more words to aid his knowing of My one law, give to him another one, and let those three words be

RHYTHMIC BALANCED INTERCHANGE."
The Secret of Light, page 104-105

"To the extent that you can extend the beauty of your imagined rhythms to material bodies built in the images of your spiritual conceptions those rhythms which you create are masterpieces of great art. The very measure of the quality of your material interpretation lies in your ability to translate imagined forms and rhythms of the universal heartbeat into bodily forms and rhythms which can re-inspire others with the ecstasy of your inspiration." Russell, Home Study Course, Unit One - Lesson 2.1


Ramsay
"It will, therefore, be very interesting to all practical musicians to find in this work of D. C. Ramsay's the hand of a true master in the science, who was also a true artist in music, as his compositions and arrangements have been acknowledged to show; and who saw no need to divorce the Art from the intellectual view of its Scientific basis. And those who can read between the lines the unwritten spiritual meanings which underlie.." [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 20]


Hughes
General remarks on the method of harmonies developing on all kinds of instruments, including the human voice
—Much paradox, but yet the scheme will admit of clear demonstration
—A musical note compared to a machine, the motive power not of our creation
—The imperfection of keyed instruments, from some notes acting two parts, attuned to the ideal of harmony within us
Macfarren quoted on the echoing power of a cathedral attuning the Amen
—Why music as an art precedes painting
—Philosophers and mathematicians have only studied music to a certain point
—Every key-note a nucleus, including the past, the present, and the future; no finality in any ultimate
—The late Sir John Herschel's views on the musical gamut alluded to
—The imperfection of keyed instruments adapts them to our present powers
—The laws will be seen to develope the twelve major and the twelve minor keys in unbroken sequence and in harmonious ratio; to gain them in geometric order [as] keyed instrument should be circular, the seven octaves interlacing in tones a lower and a higher series, . 15 [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Table of Contents1 - Harmonies]

"In every art or science, we expect accuracy according to the nature of the subject-matter, and the end which it is proposed to attain."
[Harmonies of Tones and Colours, The Method of Development or Creation of Harmonies1, page 15]


Of course, true Art cannot be opposed to Nature, although all the rules of the musician are not the facts of Nature. Music, pure, natural, and harmonical, in the true and evident sense of the term, is the division of any key-note, or starting-point, into its integral and ultimate parts, and the descending divisions will always answer to the ascending, having reference to a general whole. The essence and mystery in the development of harmonies consist in the fact that every key-note, or unit, is a nucleus including the past, the present, and the future, having in itself an inherent power, with a tendency to expand and contract. In the natural system, as each series rises, its contents expand and fall back to the original limit from any point ascending or descending; we cannot perceive finality in any ultimate; every tone is related to higher and lower tones, and must be a part of an organised whole. It is well known how deeply the late Sir John Herschel studied this subject; and it was his opinion that there was some principle in the science of music which had yet to be discovered.[Harmonies of Tones and Colours, The Method of Development or Creation of Harmonies2, page 16]

1872.—"It gives me great pleasure to write to you on this subject. Music deals more with the imaginative faculty than any other art or science, and possessing, as it does, the power of affecting life, and making great multitudes feel as one, may have more than ordinary sympathy with the laws you work upon. You say 'from E, root of B, the fountain key-note F, root of C, rises.' There is a singular analogy here in the relativities of sounds, as traced by comparing the numbers made together by vibrations of strings with the length of strings themselves, the one is the inverse or the counterchange of the other. The length of B and E are the counterchange of F and C, hence they are twin sounds in harmony." [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Extracts from Dr. Gauntlett's Letters1, page 48]

"Harmony must be looked at in two ways at least: first, up the score from bottom to top—the perpendicular view; second, along the score from side to side—the horizontal view. Then as to its periods or pulsations—its to and fro, its flow and ebb. This brings us to rhythm and measure. At the bottom of these lie what is called stress or accentemission and remission—strong and weak: of these the bar in modern music is an outward and visible sign of certain facts which ought to be in the music, but which, if not in the music, the presence of the bar is of no avail. The bar cannot give stress or accent. 'Wherever there is time, there must be accent;'* but the tick of a clock has no accent. Hullah (or Chorley) should have said life." "The semitone makes music. What operation has it upon the accent or to and fro? It creates the call, it supplies the answer." [This point, I believe, Dr. Gauntlett never alluded to with me, and I have feared that making no difference between tones and semitones might be considered a difficulty with regard to the scheme. In the working of the natural laws of harmony, they must all equally be employed.—F. J. H.] "Art (grand and true) does not depend upon the teaching of facts. The head is of less importance than the heart. Unless the tone of feeling, the habit and disposition, be well fixed, nothing enduring can come out of the misdirected artist." [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Fragments from the Last Note-book, page 50]

"Beauty in art is not sensual or intellectual; truth, heart-feeling." [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Fragments from the Last Note-book, page 50]

"The authorities in the City are interesting themselves in the welfare of the new Musical School at South Kensington. Music is not simply a science, nor is it simply an art; it must be taught on some principle, for some definite purpose." "It must be taught as it was taught in the [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Fragments from the Last Note-book, page 50]

"So long as music was taught primarily for worship, and to proclaim the immortality of man by the inestimable gift of the Royal Ransomer, it culminated to wonders upon wonders." "Noble teachers yield noble teaching, and from such seed the reaping is noble music. To rear the musician with knightly, faithful, and pure feelings, he must believe in his mission and its reward. The law of his life must be the advancement of his art, or rather God's art, given for the honour of the Deity and the elevation of humanity." "The Apostle Paul tells us that we are to teach one another in music, and the greatest doctor in theology, the mightiest defender of the Faith, has been the giant Handel in his oratorio of The Messiah. We are told that 'the nineteenth century is weary of the religion of Christ,' and the bright smile of the English boy and the sweet face of the English girl are no longer to be gladdened by the teachings of the holy mystery. The Devil is the strongest opponent to music in its right intention." [Harmonies of Tones and Colours, Fragments from Dr. Gauntlett's Last Note-book, page 51]

See Also


Art of Music
Genius

Created by Dale Pond. Last Modification: Tuesday September 28, 2021 02:47:07 MDT by Dale Pond.