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Opinion

"The opinion of 10,000 men is of no value if none of them know anything about the subject." [Marcus Aurelius]

"In Science the authority embodied in the opinion of thousands is not worth a spark of reason in one man." [Galileo Galilei]

"The difference between a truth based on an opinion and on wisdom is this. Wisdom backs itself up by science; opinion gives no proof but someone's opinion. Here is the difference. Man who is under the wisdom of opinion has no idea on what his opinions are based. All controversy springs from this error." [Quimby]


Ramsay

WITH THEIR RATIO NUMBERS.


In the center column are the notes, named; with the lesser and larger steps of their mathematical evolution marked with commas, sharps, and flats; the comma and flat of the descending evolution placed to the left; the comma and sharp of the ascending evolution to the right; and in both cases as they arise. If a note is first altered by a comma, this mark is placed next to the letter; if first altered by a sharp or flat, these marks are placed next the letter. It will be observed that the sharpened note is always higher a little than the note above it when flattened; A# is higher than ♭B; and B is higher than ♭C, etc.; thus it is all through the scales; and probably it is also so with a fine voice guided by a true ear; for the natural tendency of sharpened notes is upward, and that of flattened notes downward; the degree of such difference is so small, however, that there has been difference of opinion as to whether the # and have a space between them, or whether they overlap, as we have shown they do. In tempered instruments with fixed keys the small disparity is ignored, and one key serves for both. In the double columns right and left of the notes are their mathematical numbers as they arise in the Genesis of the scales. In the seven columns right of the one number-column, and in the six on the left of the other, are the 12 major and their 12 relative minor scales, so arranged that the mathematical number of their notes is always standing in file with their notes. D in A minor is seen as 53 1/3, while the D of C major is 54; this is the comma of difference in the primitive Genesis, and establishes the sexual distinction of major and minor all through. The fourth of the minor is always a comma lower than the second of the major, though having the same name; this note in the development of the scales by flats drops in the minor a comma below the major, and in the development of the scales by sharps ascends in the major a comma above the minor. In the head of the plate the key-notes of the 12 majors, and under them those of their relative minors, are placed over the respective scales extended below. This plate will afford a good deal of teaching to a careful student; and none will readily fail to see beautiful indications of the deep-seated Duality of Major and Minor. [Scientific Basis and Build of Music, page 109]


Hughes
Of course, true Art cannot be opposed to Nature, although all the rules of the musician are not the facts of Nature. Music, pure, natural, and harmonical, in the true and evident sense of the term, is the division of any key-note, or starting-point, into its integral and ultimate parts, and the descending divisions will always answer to the ascending, having reference to a general whole. The essence and mystery in the development of harmonies consist in the fact that every key-note, or unit, is a nucleus including the past, the present, and the future, having in itself an inherent power, with a tendency to expand and contract. In the natural system, as each series rises, its contents expand and fall back to the original limit from any point ascending or descending; we cannot perceive finality in any ultimate; every tone is related to higher and lower tones, and must be a part of an organised whole. It is well known how deeply the late Sir John Herschel studied this subject; and it was his opinion that there was some principle in the science of music which had yet to be discovered.[Harmonies of Tones and Colours, The Method of Development or Creation of Harmonies2, page 16]


Cayce
"The less one thinks of their own opinions, and the better listener one becomes, greater may be the opportunities for being of help or benefit to those around them." [Cayce 2612-1]

"Think not more highly of thy opinion than ye ought. Neither be ye over righteous in self. For these are condemnations, and as ye condemn, so are ye condemned. Do that - and ye will find thy life opening to that of joy, harmony, beauty. For ye have much to do but of thyself alone ye can do little." [Cayce 3800-1]

"But the less one thinks of self's opinions, and the better listener one becomes, greater may be the opportunities for being of help or benefit to those about the entity." [Cayce (2612-1)]

“I take the ground that God never made a belief. A belief is of man and is intended to satisfy him instead of true wisdom. If God ever spake, he spoke the truth which liberated men and bound him with no obligations. When man speaks, he always tells a lie; that is, in explaining a phenomenon, he imposes a belief and invents opinions which blind people to truth. Science is the voice of God, opinions that of man. So when man speaks in his own knowledge, he gives an opinion; but when he tells a truth, that is of God.” [Phineas Parkhurst Quimby, Article: Elements of Progress, Aristocracy, Freedom, Conservatism & Abolitionism]

See Also


Belief
Dogmatism
Error
Idea
Illusion
Knowing
Truth
Wisdom

Created by Dale Pond. Last Modification: Saturday April 3, 2021 07:25:02 MDT by Dale Pond.