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amphiprotic

In chemistry, an amphoteric compound is a molecule or ion that can react both as an acid as well as a base. The word is derived from the Greek word amphoteroi (ἀμφότεροι) meaning "both". Many metals (such as copper, zinc, tin, lead, aluminium, and beryllium) form amphoteric oxides or hydroxides. Amphoterism depends on the oxidation states of the oxide.

One type of amphoteric species are amphiprotic molecules, which can either donate or accept a proton (H+). Examples include amino acids and proteins, which have amine and carboxylic acid groups, and self-ionizable compounds such as water.

Ampholytes are amphoteric molecules that contain both acidic and basic groups and will exist mostly as zwitterions in a certain range of pH. The pH at which the average charge is zero is known as the molecule's isoelectric point. Ampholytes are used to establish a stable pH gradient for use in isoelectric focusing. Wikipedia, Amphiteric

See Also

Balance
Neutral

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